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. that package heads to the senate after the president's inauguration. >>> alexis, wineman grew up knowing she was not like any other kids, but it wasn't until she turned 11 that she really found out why. here's dr. sanjay gupta with the story of a girl who did not let her disorder get in the way of her dreams. >> reporter: miss montana surrounded by more than 50 other bo beauty queens on stage. for most of her life, alexis, wineman spent her time alone. >> i was very quiet. i couldn't say anything right. i was picked on for the way i spoke. i didn't have any friends. >> reporter: her parents knew there wassing ing ssomething w their small town didn't have the resources to figure out what it was. at the age of 11, a doctor finely put the name to wineman's condition, pervasive development disorder, a mile form of autism. typically children with autism are intelligent but very quiet. typically they don't end up becoming beauty queens either. but wineman said one day she simply decided not to let her condition define her. >> i wanted to accept myself and my autism and i realized that my autism d
of violence. >> are you optimistic alexis? >> i think there is still a lot of work to do, work to do in terms of other proposals. but in general, i am optimistic. i think this is an opportunity to make real change happen. >> colin, the vice president mentioned you by name. what's your reaction again to what you heard today? >> that was quite shocking to hear my name mentioned by that. overall, highly encouraged by the leadership from the white house on this issue coupled with the overwhelming support from grassroots people from across the country, including gun owners and nra members who have reached out saying what you are talking about makes sense. we think coming from the top down and working from the bottom up, it's going to lead to some positive change in the country. >> you are part of the brady campaign. you fight for gun control measureses. it has become a very personal calling for you. do you think that the president can legislatively get through an assault weapons ban? >> i think we need to look at all the proposals that he is putting out there. if we get success on any one of those
designers, michelle obama always makes a statement. alexis brian morgan. >> i remember seeing a picture of her in brazil in a one shouldered rachel roy dress with black and gold wooden bangles, quite frankly she looked kind of hot, but still very appropriate in her role. when have you ever said that a first lady looks hot? >> mrs. obama wasn't always a darling of the fashion world. sure, she knocked our socks off with that ivory ball grown. but in the early days of her husband's first term, she was often more buttoned up, suits and separates first game way to sheaths and those pearls ala jackie kennedy. >> she loves fashion forward jewelry, she still wears pearls and mix things 20g9. wear a cardigan, it's not just the twin set, she mixes things together. and wears it with a vintage belt, there are elements that are definitely feel jackie ochlgt, but she has completely her own twist on everything. >> reporter: alexis believes mrs. obama started out wearing what she thought she should as first lady and then started taking more fashion risks as she settled into her role. bold colors, toe f
expect quite a bit. >> thank you so much from new york. alexis wineman grew up knowing she was not like other kids, but not until she turned 11 she found out why. the story of this girl who did not let her disorder get in the way of her dreams. >> miss montana surrounded by 50 other beauty queens on stage. all hoping to become miss america. for most of her early life. alexis wineman spent time alone. >> i was very quiet because i couldn't say anything right. i was picked on for the way i spoke. i didn't have any friends. >> her parents knew there was something wrong, but the small town didn't have the resources to figure out what it was. at the age of 11 after years and years of searching for answers, a doctor put a name to wineman's condition. pervasive development disorder, a mild form of autism. >> children with autism are very intelligent, but very quiet and socially awkward and don't respond appropriately to interactions with other people. typically they don't become beauty queens either, but one day she simply decided not to let her condition define her. >> i longed to accept myse
. >> michelle really loves alexis jewelry. she still wears pearls. it's not just the twin set. she mixes things together an wears where vicinitiage belts. there are elements that are jackie o. but she has her own twist on everything. alexis believes mrs. obama started out wearing what she thought she should as first lady and then started taking more fashion risks as she settled into her role, bold color, patterns, pointed toe flats and even neon nail polish. her gray nail polish was a big talker. >> she wear clothes with a metallic sheen. it just reflects the light an catches her skin in a beautiful way. that's another thing that's really smart. >> reporter: mrs. obama signature style has evolved into what she likes to call lady like with a twist. the look most often includes skirts and dresses that are circular, lots of floral, texture and jewel sleeveless to show off her toned arms. many women say it's her every day style that has such appeal. >> people definitely love her style because it's relatable. they will see her wearing a j crew cardigan that they can do themselves. they can look just
. sam off to judge. there's one contestant making history. miss montana, alexis wineman, is going to be the first contestant with autism. >> reporter: she is an incredible woman. she is the first contestant with autism. and the youngest contestant. and she's not letting any of it keep her from her dream. in a competition filled with smiles, struts and sass, the reigning miss montana looks like she fits right in. >> holy crap. i'm going to be on miss america. >> reporter: but fitting in has never been easy for 18-year-old alexis wineman. >> growing up, i was alone a lot. i barely hung out with anyone. and that's because i was afraid of being laughed at. >> reporter: she is the first miss america contestant to be diagnosed with autism, which was discovered when she was just 11 years old. >> i would stay in my room for hours, not wanting to talk to anyone. >> reporter: even though she was considered highly functioning, she said she was ridiculed because of her speech impediment and intense shyness. >> the girl you're seeing right now, is not the same girl you would have seen ten year
, the personal. two takes on what happened at the white house today. alexy haller, the uncle of noah pozner. along with colin goddard. colin was shot four times in a classroom at virginia tech. i was wondering what your reaction was to what you heard. >> based on what we heard before the announcement when the families met with the president and the vice president and during the announcement itself, i was satisfied and pleased to see that the administration is treating this so seriously. and i think the strong sense i got was that they were determined to make a major change here and to enact significant reforms that would put a stop to this kind of violence. >> are you optimistic? >> i'm optimistic to some of the proposals. i still think there is a lot of work to do. i still think there is work to do in terms of other proposals. but in general i am optimistic. i think that this is an opportunity to make real change happen. >> colin, the vice president mentioned you by name. what is your reaction to what you heard today? >> that was quite shocking to hear my name mentioned like that. but over
humphreys and alexis johnson from the american values institute. with the american value institute. i think we've gotten women, 11 kids, and we've got a guy that's an admitted drug dealer. tell me what's wrong with this picture? >> i think that's wrong is oxygen under this and oprah trying to target young african-americans that are outrageous and offensive and i find the programming racist and hold them accountable. >> sean: do you think it's racist. >> absolutely. >> sean: why do you think it's racist? >> people are trying to reinforce really negative stereotypes about african-americans. >> sean: i mean, jeri springer has people of all races on. >> it's dehumanizing. >> sean: i agree with that. now what it is? you've just got to find something better for programming. i mean, they have all the right to run anything they want, people can watch what they want, but we can't do better than this, rusty? >> it's absolutely shameful. i was born in georgia, i lived in atlanta, you lived in atlanta. >> sean: it's not bankhead, it's buckhead. >> it's not just embarrassing as a georgian or an atlantae
proposal in washington. with us now is alexi, noah's uncle. i understand you had concerns that your voice, your family's voice was not being heard by the white house. you just heard from them moments ago. what did they say? >> that's correct. the white house contacted me on my way -- while i was on my way to the show. i had sent an e-mail about eight days ago to an aide of president obama asking questions about whether the families would have an opportunity to speak about the proposal. and an opportunity to be heard. and i never received a response to that e-mail. according to the call i just received, it was a miscommunication at the white house. and that's why there was no response to the e-mail. they apologized for that. >> why do you think they reached out to you now? one of our producers called them today in anticipation of the interview to get a comment and i think the associated press also ran a story on it, too. do you think that's what did it? >> i think to help them understand the situation better in terms of the family's desire to speak to vice president biden. my understanding
from whether or not if something can pass to really when it is. and i think that time is now. >> alexy, i appreciate you being on tonight, and colin as well. thank you very much. let's talk about the politics. so far they have included that nra ad, the congressional threat of impeachment. here to talk about it cnn contributor and consultant margaret hooper, charles below and david gergen. david, when you look at these proposals, are some of them non-starters? >> i think first of all, we have to say, anderson, many times in the past we have complained about a lack of leadership by president obama. this time he has stepped up. he is taking the lead. this is what a president who is really committed. >> he went big. >> he went big. you have to give him credit for that. his problem is that he is handicapped. he doesn't have enough power through the executive office to do this alone. most of these are small bore initiatives that he is going to do on his own. he needs the congress to get this done. and so far we have to bring politics into this, because this is a political matter in this trag
made. joining me now is dr. alexis pal per rin. good to see you. >> nice to see you. >> how are things at your e.r.? >> crowded. it's a mess, we've gotten to the point where we're handing out masks when people come in with any kind of could have or fever or body ache. >> you said the hallways are lined and we've seen that in other hospitals across country. >> we don't have room in the waiting room. >> are people coming in who shouldn't be in the e.r.? >> if you're starting to get flu symptoms, don't come to the e.r., go to your primary doctor. if it's early in the course and you do test positive, they can give you tam iflu. if you're having flu symptoms, the e.r. is not best place for you. there are a lot sick patients and people that can catch the flu from you and can give you whatever they have. it's not the best place for people starting to get sick. >> the vast majority of people who get this vaccine will not get the flu but there are a minority, i hope it's okay for me to say this, who get immunized and get sick anyway. you were one of them. >> yes, i was. >> without getting into
life, alexis wineman spent her time alone. >> i was very quiet because i couldn't say anything right. i was picked on for the way i spoke. i really didn't have any friends. >> reporter: her parents knew there was something wrong, but their small town of cutbank, montana, didn't have the resources to figure out what it was. at age 11, after years and years of searching for answers, a doctor finally put a name to her condition -- pervasive development disorder. a mild form of autism. typically children with autism are very intelligent. but very quiet. socially awkward, and they don't respond appropriately to interactions with other people. typically they don't end up becoming beauty queens either. but wineman says one day she simply decided not to let her condition define her. >> i longed to really accept myself and my autism. and i realized that my autism isn't what defines me. i define what is autism. >> she entered the miss montana pageants as a way to prove to herself she could do anything she set her mind to. >> i fell in love with the program. good thing, too, because i won. i wasn'
. sanjay gupta introduces us to alexis weinman in this week's "human factor." miss montana surrounded by more than 50 other beauty queens on stage all hoping to become miss america. for most of her early life she spent her time alone. >> i was quiet because i couldn't say anything right. i was picked on for the way i spoke. i really didn't have any friends. >> reporter: her parents knew there was something wrong but the small town of cut bank, montana, didn't have the resources to figure out what it was. at the age of 11 after years and years of searching for answers a doctor finally put a name to weinman's division, pervasive development disorder, a mild form of autism. typically children with autism are very intelligent but very quiet, socially awkward and don't respond appropriately to interactions with other people. typically they don't end up becoming beauty queens either but weinman says one day she simply decided not to let her condition define her. >> i wanted to accept myself and my autism and i realized my autism isn't what defines me. i define what is autism. >> reporter: s
the sunshine comes out in florida, we're in pretty good shape. i'm with alexis and gina and this is diego. the whole idea if you visit this area, you get a chance to get this close with diego and have some interaction. they'll take care of letting you know what is safe and what you can do and what you can't do. if you come down. so, let's talk a little about the weather. we'll show you exactly what's going on. we need to talk about the snow and ice situation that moves through the country. thank you, diego. there is going to be some areas that gets some freezing rain out of this. north carolina and georgia. stay up with your abc stations. south of the front, look at the difference. look at the difference between orlando, where we are, and in georgia. and look at the numbers in south florh of that front is a really good deal. that arctic air staying in place for a good part of the country today. >> we're just hanging out with diego. but diego's sounds are much better than my dolphin sounds. can you say lara? that's dolphin for lara. >> thank you. thank you. thank you, sam. we'll be back to
a organization and speaks out denies knowing about the so-called brothel run by alexis wright, but admits to co-signing a loan. >> never became romantic. we did have intimate moments, but it's not what i would consider romantic. >> and i'm confused about the difference. >> want to explain. >> when it involves money. >> brian: i'm going to reread my issue of glamour and find out if there is with a difference. >> alisyn: her alleged client list 150 men, some well-known around town and those are your headlines. >> steve: okay, not too long ago out in mt. carmel, pennsylvania, we'll tell you a little how a girl was talking to another girl while waiting for the bus and involved a hello kitty paint gun. >> alisyn: bubble gun. >> steve: you're not going to believe what happened to the kid. >> alisyn: they were five years old. >> they were five. >> alisyn: more on that and also, who can forget this moment? >> ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country. >> alisyn: and on this inaugural weekend we'll take a look back at some of the most memorable speeches given by past
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)

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